2020 San Diego County Supervisor District 3 - Terra Lawson Remer


Terra Lawson Remer

Candidate: Terra Lawson Remer

 

1) What are your top 3 priorities for improving the biking experience in District 3 for residents and families?

I believe that San Diego County as a whole needs to expand and improve our sustainable transit options, ranging from walking and biking to public transit. Making our communities more bikeable primary boils down to improving our default street design, prioritizing separated bike lanes, and creating a real network of bike lanes. Our roads were structured almost exclusively for cars for decades and only recently have started to take into account the much wider range of transit options we need to support. A key element to this is making bike lanes that provide real safety to occupants, such as by separation from traffic by bollards, parking spaces, or green medians. To make these safe lanes functional, we also need to ensure that they form an integrated network (not just isolated chunks) and enable riders to safely and speedily get to work, school, recreation, and other destinations.

 

2) SANDAG just presented its vision for San Diego’s transportation future in 5 Big Moves. Do you support 5 Big Moves and how did you come to this conclusion?

I am broadly supportive of the 5 Big Moves, and think that this regional conversation is long overdue. I believe we need a holistic approach that will protect the environment, support sustainable communities, and get people where they need to go in a timely fashion. That will require support for public transit, roads, and alternative transit options- not one or the other. We cannot have a one size fits all approach because our region is diverse, and the vision largely recognizes that. I am committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions and making the investments to improve our quality of life.

 

3) As county supervisor, you may have the opportunity to serve on the boards of MTS or SANDAG. (How) would you advocate for SANDAG’s bicycle early action program, which has experienced significant delays? Would you support MTS ballot measures that include funding for bicycle infrastructure?

San Diego is a fantastic place to live, in part because it is already well-suited to biking (no snowstorms!). But we need to invest in improving our roads and bike lanes to make them safe and accessible for everyone. I support SANDAG’s bicycle early action program and would advocate for it on the County Board and at SANDAG. I cannot commit to supporting any ballot measure without seeing the specifics, but I am broadly supportive of investing in our bicycle infrastructure, such as a network of separated bike lanes on major thoroughfares.

 

4) Please share a memorable experience(s) you have of bicycling.

My passion for biking really began while I was attending law school at NYU. One year, I decided to bike from lower Manhattan to Mount Vernon (New York, not Virginia) to see my grandparents for Passover. While Google maps indicates this would take about two hours, the lack of bike paths, clear signage, and safe freeway crossings meant that my route was perilous and required walking my bike through and across dirt lanes and freeway overpasses more than once. I somehow got stuck in a marsh, after passing through Harlem and the Bronx and getting stranded on the wrong side of the Hudson River. It took four hours not two, and I arrived sweaty and exhausted for Passover Seder. But it was an adventure to remember and I developed a much better appreciation of the vital importance of adequate bike infrastructure!

 



53rd District Candidate Responses

2020 California's 53rd Congressional District Questionnaire - Georgette Gómez


Georgette Gomez

Candidate: Georgette Gómez

 

1) What are your top 3 priorities for improving the biking experience for residents and families in National City?

  • Dedicated bike lanes in high density areas needs to be available for commuters
  • Intra-regional bike lanes connecting high density areas need to be made available for commuters and leisure activities
  • Public bike storage in dense commercial areas should be made available for commuters
  • Public bike rental should be invested in as a region
  • Fight hard to implement SANDAGs 5 Big Moves and make sure our region gets its fair share of infrastructure funding but tie the dollars to Mode shift projects.

 

2) Can you give an example of how you have advocated for Active Transportation in the past?

As a former chair and current board member of SANDAG I have been extremely aggressive in pushing active transit options for our region. I have helped secure millions of dollars in funding towards expansion of dedicated bike lanes and bike paths, including the recent “Uptown Bikeways” project that will connect Hillcrest, Balboa Park and downtown San Diego.

During the coronavirus pandemic I have expanded the “Slower Streets” program, which opened up residential streets to biking as a safe and healthy transit and leisure option for families during the pandemic. I am a longtime advocate and activist for biking as a public official, a private citizen and a huge biker myself.

 

3) Please share a memorable experience(s) you have of bicycling.

  • My first travel bike trip with Nicole Burgess, very challenging but also very enjoyable. My trip with Bike SD a few weeks ago, Biking for Climate event.
  • Organizing the first GOTV Bike ride for Candidate for Mayor David Alvarez
  • Organizing a bike ride in City Heights to engage the community early on to highlight the importance of the proposed SANDAG bike path projects.

 



2020 VOTE - North Park Planning Group

BikeSD Endorses Rise North Park Candidates for North Park Planning Group

We support these candidates for the Community Planning Groups (CPGs) in North Park and Uptown (Hillcrest, Mission Hills, and Bankers Hill) because CPGs have a powerful influence on many aspects of the built environment of our communities. In the past we have had bikeway projects die because CPG board members were resistant to approving these kinds of projects. In order to make our streets safer, we need to elect board members who will support Complete Streets and other projects that increase mobility options. Here are the candidates that will help make our communities better for pedestrians and families riding bicycles.

BikeSD has endorsed all the candidates running as collectively as "Rise North Park" running for election on March 17, 2020 for North Park Planning Group.  The Rise North Park Candidates are running on the values of transit choice and creating housing of all types, while supporting the growing economy in North Park. To be eligible to vote in the upcoming election North Park residents must have signed in to one North Park Planning Group Meeting in the past twelve months. The last meeting before the vote is this Tuesday, February 18, 2020.  If you support increased mobility options in North Park like 30th Street or the SANDAG Projects then come out to Waypoint Public this Tuesday at 6:30 and meet the Rise North Park Candidates before signing into the NPPG meeting next door.  Don't worry it only takes 10 minutes!

RISE NORTH PARK CANDIDATES:

Ginger Partyka

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I’ve been a homeowner and resident of North Park since 2015.  I’m a strong proponent and user of local businesses and hope to support a community framework in which those businesses can continue to thrive.  I’m a passionate advocate of reducing traffic, improving community interactions, and increasing affordable housing through increasing housing and transportation choice.  I love the atmosphere of our dense and vibrant community and want to support planning that furthers increased face-to-face interactions between North Park’s members.  I’m very excited about the opportunity to serve the North Park residents on the planning committee.

Beau Benko

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My name is Beau Benko and I’m running for the North Park Planning Committee because I want to support and represent North Park. There’s a lot I love already in North Park, from the community and the people to the businesses, and the spots to view a great sunset. But I believe North Park still has incredible potential for growth. I believe in more housing for more neighbors and I believe we need to work toward a world with no pedestrian deaths. I believe we can support more local businesses and that everyone benefits when multiple modes of transit are supported.

 

Rebecca Lieberman

I am running to be on the North Park Planning Committee because I want to become a more involved member of my vibrant North Park community. I live with my partner, Ben, and our sheepadoodle puppy, Woody, in the southwest corner of the neighborhood. We moved to San Diego when Ben received orders to the USS San Diego, stationed out of the 32nd Street Navy Base. Ben and I chose to live in North Park for many reasons: we love its historic homes, diversity of restaurants, and plethora of breweries. However, the key reason we chose North Park is because we could both bike to work and walk to dinner.

As a city planner by trade, I seek to live in and create vibrant and livable urban spaces. In my current role as a policy advisor at the San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce, I understand the importance of small businesses, affordable homes, and an array of transportation options to our regional economy. I believe North Park is one of the most unique neighborhoods in San Diego because of its strong local economy, walkable streets, and proximity to Balboa Park and I hope to use my seat on the planning committee to lift up and support the parts of the neighborhood that I love.

Jessica Ripper

I am running to be on the North Park Planning Committee I moved to San Diego six years ago, already passionate about building communities that are great places for diverse people to live, work, play, and learn. Since then, I’ve transitioned from a 15-year career working with nonprofits and philanthropy to a new role consulting on housing and community development. These experiences help me to explore ideas from multiple perspectives to help bring about solutions that meet current community needs while maintaining the flexibility to adapt to a changing environment. I’m also thrilled that my family will finally be moving into our home in the heart of North Park this summer.

Marissa Tucker

As an avid pedestrian, I’ve come to appreciate North Park’s craftsman’s, garden apartments, even its infamous Huffman 6-packs, and the new stark modern marvels: They all tell the story of a North Park that is always evolving. As we move toward the future we look to North Park’s past for guidance: it’s willingness to change in order to ensure that North Park remains a strong working and middle class neighborhood where families of all income levels can thrive.

As San Diego faces a housing crisis, we know that we need to ensure we’re building affordable housing for those just starting families and those who wish to retire in our amenities rich neighborhood. But we also face a climate crisis. As we transition away from fossil fuels, we need to ensure we create safe infrastructure to allow people to choose active transit options such as walking, biking, scooting, and busing. As the YIMBY Democratic San Diego club president and Rise North Park founder, I’m not satisfied with just voting, I’m committed to leading on these values.

Daniel Molitor

As an avid pedestrian, I’ve come to appreciate North Park’s I chose to make North Park my home after growing up in Indiana and spending five years in the Bay Area. I fell in love with North Park’s lively yet relaxed character and its wonderful vibes. As a progressive neighborhood, we should be leading the fight against climate change: We have to fight sprawl and long commutes, and that means building more homes near where the jobs are and where people want to be. We also need to make it easier to develop car-free habits of getting around. That means taking the opportunity when planning infrastructure and development to prioritize buses and protect people whether they’re walking, biking, scooting or skating. My vision of North Park preserves its vibes and essence while beautifying our built environment, cleaning the air, and improving the safety of our public spaces.


2020 SD City Council District 7 Candidate Responses

2020 National City Council Questionnaire - Marcus Bush


Candidate: Marcus Bush

 

1) What are your top 3 priorities for improving the biking experience for residents and families in National City?

My top 3 priorities for improving the biking experience for residents and families in National City are planning for and constructing more protected bike lanes, encouraging our schools to get students to bike (bike/walk to school day, installing more bike racks at schools, etc.), and overall promoting more of a bike culture in National City by hosting more events.

 

2) How do Vision Zero and Climate Goals (such as mode share targets) fit with your vision for National City?

Although National City has been consistently ranked as one of the most walkable cities in the County, it also has a high amount of pedestrian/cycling accidents with vehicles. Vision Zero goals will make it safer for people to walk and bike which in the long run will help achieve Climate goals for increasing mode share shift and reducing Vehicle Miles Traveled, which ultimately reduces Greenhouse Gas emissions. However, as a City, we also need to look at updating our Climate Action Plan with more stringent goals and targets, which could be modeled after the City of San Diego’s Climate Action Plan.

 

3) Transportation is the largest source of the San Diego region’s GHG emissions (55%). What steps will you take to meet regional air quality and GHG reduction goals are met or exceeded?

As a Councilmember in National City, I would work with the Mayor and Council on updating our Climate Action Plan with more stringent targets for mode share shift and VMT reduction. That process could take a year or 2 and in that time, we as a Council could also do more to overall encourage and promote the bike culture in National City, by hosting bike events in the City, having our staff and elected leadership be seen biking, work with the school districts on potential incentives and programs to encourage the students and faculty to bike to school more, and continuing the city’s engineering staff implementation on bike lanes throughout the City. As a Councilmember I would also support the efforts of our SANDAG Board Rep, Mayor Alejandra Sotelo-Solis and her advocacy at the SANDAG Board so that we can continue to get more funding for regional bike projects such as the Bayshore Bikeway, which still has segments that need to be completed.

 

4) Safe bike lanes often face opposition due to slower road speeds or reduced street parking. How would you work with the community to address concerns without compromising safety or delaying bike infrastructure in the name of consensus?

I would work with the community early on in the process, using the community-based outreach model I used while working for Council President Georgette Gómez’s office to approve the Orange Avenue Bikeway. We did that by reaching out to schools, and community-based organizations to educate residents and rally support. Parents who wanted safety for their kids were a key priority and we were able to overcome neighborhood opposition by turning out supporters and focusing on safety for families over parking spaces for vehicles.

 

5) Please share a memorable experience you have of bicycling.

My most memorable biking experience was my bike-camping trip with Nicole Burgess, Georgette Gómez, her partner, and Nicole’s friend to Crystal Cove State Park just before New Year’s in 2018. It was truly a multi-modal experience, where we took the train from Santa Fe Depot to Irvine, rode our bikes to Newport and along the coast, then hiking up the mountains to our campsite.

 



2020 SD City Council District 7 Candidate Responses

2020 City Council Questionnaire - District 7: McIntyre, Wheatcroft

2020 SD City Council District 7 Candidate Responses

 


Candidate: Monty A. McIntyre

 

1) What are your top 3 priorities for improving the biking experience in District 7 for residents and families?

1. Maintain bike lanes so they are free of potholes, ruts or significant cracks.
2. Coordinate restriping when streets are resurfaced.
3. Support the continuing construction of proposed bike lanes.

 

2) San Diego’s Bicycle Master Plan needs updating and projects need prioritizing in order to create a complete bicycle network. A large number of street resurfacing projects need to be re striped with bicycle infrastructure. How would you propose to fund the full build-out of the bicycle network needed to achieve the Vision Zero goals and meet the Climate Action Plan mode share targets?

We need to make the project approval process more predictable, faster and customer-friendly.
We will need to find new revenue sources to build-out the bicycle network.

 

3) Transportation is the largest source of San Diego’s greenhouse gas emissions (55%). The City’s Climate Action Plan bicycle mode share goals are 6% of commuter trips by 2020 and 18% by 2035, from about 1% today. What steps will you take to make sure these goals are met or exceeded?

We need to creatively look for ways to incentivize people to move to neighborhoods where they can work, work at home, or work at a place close to their home that they can bike to.

 

4) Safe bike lanes often face opposition due to slower road speeds or reduced street parking. How would you work with the community to address concerns without compromising safety or delaying bike infrastructure in the name of consensus?

We need to educate our citizens about the benefits of bike lanes and using bikes for transportation as an alternative to cars. Also, we need to make the project approval process more predictable, faster and customer-friendly, while ensuring all impacted residents have an opportunity to be heard.

 

5) Please share a memorable experience(s) you have of bicycling.

When I was in college, a firefighter friend named Ken, who rode his bike to work every day, suggested that we go on a bike ride from where I lived near Avocado Boulevard in La Mesa to Auga Caliente Hot Springs. Thinking I was in great shape because I exercised and ran regularly, I agreed. I rode my bike a little to get ready, but not regularly like Ken did. I had no idea, however, what I was getting myself into!
One weekend morning we made the ride. We rode from La Mesa up to Julian. There were many times going up the mountain to Julian that I had to stop and rest. I wondered if I would ever make it. I hung in there, Ken was patient with me, and we ultimately made it to Julian. We then rode full speed down Banner Grade to get to Auga Caliente Hot Springs. That was a blast! I don’t think I’ve ever gone so fast on a bike! By the time we made it to Auga Caliente Hot Springs I was exhausted. We enjoyed camping there for the weekend, but we decided to put our bikes in the truck and enjoy the drive home when we returned to San Diego!

 


Candidate: Wendy Wheatcroft (ENDORSED BY BIKESD)

 

1) What are your top 3 priorities for improving the biking experience in District 7 for residents and families?

  • Expanding Vision Zero street, sidewalk, and intersection safety surveys to include and emphasize safety improvements at the network-scale, to create Vision Zero Neighborhoods.
  • Coordinating the City of San Diego, San Diego Unified School District, and MTS to create an enhanced Safe Routes to School vision.
  • Implementing a “Twenty is Plenty” campaign, while improving the built environment with significant traffic calming, to slow and divert traffic from neighborhood streets, and promoting travel-alternatives to cars, which are the number-one danger to bicyclists.

 

2) San Diego’s Bicycle Master Plan needs updating and projects need prioritizing in order to create a complete bicycle network. A large number of street resurfacing projects need to be restriped with bicycle infrastructure. How would you propose to fund the full build-out of the bicycle network needed to achieve the Vision Zero goals and meet the Climate Action Plan mode share targets?

  • Repeal the People’s Ordinance. An approximately $50 million influx to the City general fund would present fresh bonding opportunity to create sustainable, long-term infrastructure for current and future generations.
  • Street infrastructure revenue from increasing the Transient Occupancy Tax should be directed first to improving the material condition of streets that also are identified for new cycling facilities in the Bicycle Master Plan.
  • Future state and federal transit revenue assistance looks likely to come with strings attached related to increasing housing. Master planning neighborhoods must include Complete Streets requirements that ensure a transit station/bicycling infrastructure “hub and spoke” make-up at community scale as a community benefit.

 

3) Transportation is the largest source of San Diego’s greenhouse gas emissions (55%). The City’s Climate Action Plan bicycle mode share goals are 6% of commuter trips by 2020 and 18% by 2035, from about 1% today. What steps will you take to make sure these goals are met or exceeded?

  • Implementing my previously listed top three priorities to unlock the latent demand for active transportation.
  • Lobby to ensure SANDAG’s “5 Big Moves” once and for all includes the full funding and implementation of the SANDAG Regional Bike Plan Early Action Program.
  • Reconstitute and fund the Civic Innovation Lab in the Mayor’s office to identify pedestrian thoroughfare, plaza, and cycling superblock opportunities to promote active transportation.
  • Create and incentivize active transportation, not just through the built environment, but in a civic credit program for reduced fare access to MTS, Balboa Park museums, the San Diego Zoo, and other institutions throughout the city.

 

4) Safe bike lanes often face opposition due to slower road speeds or reduced street parking. How would you work with the community to address concerns without compromising safety or delaying bike infrastructure in the name of consensus?

  • First, reducing roads speeds to improve safety is foundational to better neighborhoods and business districts. I will say so explicitly over and over again. It’s a feature, not a bug of what these projects are trying to do.
  • We must educate the public, not just on outreach as it pertains to what we want to do here, but what has been successful at improving the quality of life in other cities. Education is the most effective tool for changing hearts and minds. Our city needs to meet our Climate Action goals, and part of that relies on making bicycling safer for our residents. The safety of the community comes before the ability to drive to your destination 30-seconds faster.
  • It will be important to present proposed changes that may inconvenience residents and solutions to the above-named objections at that same time, early in the process, and build consensus across all stakeholders.

 

5) Please share a memorable experience(s) you have of bicycling.

I love renting bikes and riding in other cities. Most recently, I took a night time bike tour of Washington, DC, this summer while I was there for a conference. It was incredible to have such a different perspective of all the monuments. I also love a good bike ride on a warm summer night.

A couple of years ago when I took my oldest daughter to San Francisco for her 6th grade trip, we rented bikes one day and rode around the entire city. The end goal was to ride over the Golden Gate Bridge, but by the time we got to the bridge, we were so exhausted from riding all day long that we could not continue. However, we saw more of the city that I had seen in an entire lifetime. Even though she complained most of the way, she still talks about it and how much fun we had. The bridge will be for another trip!

My family loves riding bikes and I know many others do too. I am fully committed to improving bike routes across San Diego.