Bike San Diego - Leading the Fight For Safer Streets in San Diego

Join us in creating a world-class city for biking!

Posted on: June 8, 2018 Posted by: Judi Tentor Comments: 0

Bike Infrastructure Explained: Bike Box

Bike box
Bike box University Ave and 6th Ave

This post is the first in a series of posts that will explain and illustrate bicycle infrastructure designs. These are the designs we want to see on our streets. These are designs that provide solutions for rider safety and comfort. All of the infrastructure featured is from the NACTO Urban Bikeway Design Guide which “is based on the experience of the best cycling cities in the world.” And here at BikeSD we want San Diego to be one of the best cycling cities in the world! So let’s start with BIKE BOX.

What is a bike box? If you google bike box, you will see a shipping box, but that is not what we are talking about. A bike box is a designated area (generally painted green) at the head of a traffic lane at a signalized intersection (an intersection with a stop light or traffic light.) It provides bicyclists with a safe and visible way to get ahead of a line of traffic during the red signal phase (when the light is red.) Nearly all the benefits of a bike box are related to increased safety for riders. But, there are some benefits to motorized vehicles that come from using bike boxes.

Bike Box Benefits

A bike box increases VISIBILITY of people riding bicycles. There are things that riders do to make themselves visible such as wearing bright clothing and using flashing lights. Being visible is key to bicycling safety. A bike box on the street helps bicycles be more visible at intersections. The bright green painted box highlights a location and motorists can expect to see someone on a bicycle in that location.

Posted on: June 4, 2018 Posted by: Paul Jamason Comments: 0

Save the Hancock Street Bike Lane

Hancock Street in Middletown

Given the photo above, you might be asking, “Save what bike lane?  All I see is another poorly-maintained San Diego street.”  Well, the City is performing the “Midway-Pacific Highway Community Plan Update” for this area, and this wide, auto-oriented stretch of Hancock Street is set to receive a Class II (unbuffered) bike lane as part of the proposed Hancock Transit Corridor:

Hancock Transit Corridor is envisioned as a multiple-use and mixed-use corridor connected to the Washington Street Trolley Station and the historic Mission Brewery, with a diverse mix of residential, office, and retail uses. Residential development, which can include workforce and affordable housing, will activate the area and take advantage of nearby access to trolley service.

Posted on: April 25, 2018 Posted by: Judi Tentor Comments: 0

SANDAG 2019 Regional Plan Transportation Themes Open Houses

SANDAG Regional Plan Transportation Themes

SANDAG is in the process of developing San Diego Forward: The 2019-2050 Regional Plan, which will outline the overarching vision for our region over the next 30 years. As part of this process, SANDAG is asking for your input on what you think the San Diego region’s transportation network should look like in the future and what transportation issues are most important for your quality of life. This survey is available through May 10.

TAKE THE SURVEY

You will have to write in BICYCLE many times on the survey questions. For example, to answer the question “What method(s) of transportation do you use during your daily commute? (Select all that apply.),” Walking and Biking are listed together under Active Transportation. Walking and Biking are transportation modes that use different infrastructure. Biking should be its own method of transportation, particularly with such an extensive list that, for example, separates Carpool and Vanpool and has separate categories for Bus and Rapid. There are three comment areas on the survey to comment and reiterate that bicycling is extremely important. Let’s make our voices heard.

Posted on: April 12, 2018 Posted by: Bike San Diego Comments: 1

Join Us in Welcoming Our New Executive Director

We are thrilled to announce that Judi Tentor has accepted the position of Executive Director for Bike San Diego. Judi will be working with John Anderson, interim ED, to transition into the role over the next month. Please feel free to reach out to her at director@bikesd.org and stay tuned for our next member meet-up (details to come) to meet her in person.

About Judi Tentor

Judi TentorJudi lives in Mission Hills, grows a lot of food in her garden, and gets around by bicycle as much as possible. She has been navigating the streets of San Diego by bicycle and transit since 2008 when she sold her Honda Element. Her passion for the environment and sustainability drives her everyday actions. Riding a bicycle, she believes, is more than a fun activity, but also a tool for transportation as well as a solution to environmental, social equity and health issues that matter to her.

Judi is also a Cycling Instructor (LCI #5098) certified by the League of American Bicyclists, the oldest bicycle advocacy org in the US. She teaches beginner classes for adults learning how to ride for the first time and traffic skills classes for intermediate riders through nonprofit organizations. She is an advocate for active transportation and a feminist, hoping to inspire more women to ride bicycles for the benefit of their health, spirit, and the planet.

Posted on: March 23, 2018 Posted by: John Anderson Comments: 1

Welcome Dockless Bikeshare Riders!

Hi! It’s Bike San Diego.  We’re the friendly local advocacy group fighting for safe streets to bicycle on – whether you’re going to work, school, the gym, or the park.  If you haven’t bicycled around the neighborhoods of San Diego in the past we’d like to welcome you the the fun and enjoyment that is riding a bike.  Congrats on taking the first step!  You’ve made a wise choice and one that is great for the environment, your health, building community, and driving our regional economy.  That’s the good news.

The bad news, as you may have already noticed, is that San Diego has very little support for people looking to bicycle – including in our most “walkable” neighborhoods.  Take a ride through North Park, or Pacific Beach, Little Italy, La Jolla, or pretty much any community.  Notice any bike lanes? Probably not.  You may find some sharrows but likely won’t find any sort of accommodation for safely and comfortably biking in our city.  High speed roads, speeding drivers, and a lack of dedicated bicycle lanes can make it intimidating to bicycle here, even for short trips.