2016 Election: Louis Rodolico on Issues that Matter to BikeSD Supporters in District 1

Our board sent questionaires to candidates running for city council and we will be posting their responses here. Louis Rodolico is running to replace termed out Councilmember Sherri Lightner who currently represents District 1.Our endorsements will be posted tomorrow, Friday.

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Louis Rodolico. Photo via Rodolico's website.

1) How do you envision the growth of cycling in San Diego – be it for transportation, recreation, or otherwise?

Bikes should be a big part of the mix,  I would work for more dedicated overhead bike lanes and have tried to get developers on board, as a councilman I would have more clout to make that happen.

2) What steps must be taken to ensure the success of San Diego’s “Vision Zero” goals?

In Amsterdam bikes share the pedestrian sidewalks. I am not comfortable riding a bike on the same road with cars and would like to see that change.

3) Given the myriad of competing interests in D1 neighborhoods, how will you handle individuals and groups, alike, whose interests and actions run counter to the City’s transportation and street design goals as laid out in the Climate Action Plan, and Vision Zero initiative?

For example building the Regents Road Bridge with bike lanes would be a good start. That would also allow us to put the bike lanes back that we took away to increase car trips on the Genesee corridor.

4) Multiple studies have shown that increased bicycle accessibility, is good for local businesses – and that this even holds true when on-street parking is reduced. How can the information gap between advocates and businesses be bridged to advance our common interests of safe, thriving neighborhoods? Further, at which point do you say to those who refuse to engage as responsible and reasonable partners in the community’s progress, that the cycle of arguments must end so we may act for the common good?

Further, at which point do you say to those who refuse to engage as responsible and reasonable partners in the community’s progress, that the cycle of arguments must end so we may act for the common good? As a councilman I will champion education thru media exposure.

5) What (if any) plans and decisions, with respect to increasing cycling accessibility, have been made in the past by government agencies and elected officials that you disagree with? Did you make public that disagreement? And do you see an opportunity, if elected, to reverse it?

See 8.

6) Will you support the implementation of the 2011 San  Diego Bicycle Master Plan Update, including    budgetary requirements for its completion and success?

Yes

7) If you have one, share a favorite cycling memory – and let us know how it shapes your desire to see safe streets in San Diego for all residents, across generations?

[No response provided]

8) Finally – If elected, will you commit to meeting with BikeSD representatives on a regular basis to continue the dialog around improving all D1 neighborhoods, and making San Diego the world’s greatest city for cycling?

I have recently gone to some SANDAG meetings and have observed that bike projects keep being put out further into the future. I intend to get involved in the Transportation committee and would make this a priority


2016 Election: Kyle Heiskala on Issues that Matter to BikeSD Supporters in District 1

Our board sent questionaires to candidates running for city council and we will be posting their responses here. Kyle Heiskala is running to replace termed out Councilmember Sherri Lightner who currently represents District 1.

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Kyle Heiskala. Photo via Heiskala's website

1) How do you envision the growth of cycling in San Diego – be it for transportation, recreation, or otherwise?

I envision the growth of cycling as a form of transportation for commuting and everyday small trips in addition to recreation. Cycling is a community builder because going through your neighborhood on a bike is a group activity that allows for a more direct interaction with your friends, neighbors and local businesses. We need more protected bike lanes so that the majority of people that do not currently feel comfortable riding a bike can start to feel safe enough to make a trip with their family to the grocery store or the park. I have demonstrated multi-million dollar bike projects that I implemented at UCSD can make cycling an option for more people.

2) What steps must be taken to ensure the success of San Diego’s “Vision Zero” goals?

Resources need to be allocated to the Vision Zero Task Force. The City’s Bicycle Master Plan and Strategic Implementation Plan need to be prioritized and funded. Plans aren't enough. We need projects in the ground now! Enforcement and improved bike facilities need to be coordinated in order to be successful. There are certain policies that should be reevaluated, like the way that speed limits are increased, and the Level of Service as a method of preventing the narrowing of car lanes and parking reductions. So much can be done to ensure that you can travel from your home to any destination on foot or by bike without fear of getting hit by a car. Educational campaigns would also be key to Vision Zero being a success. The top most dangerous corridors would clearly be prioritized first.

3) Given the myriad of competing interests in D1 neighborhoods, how will you handle individuals and groups, alike, whose interests and actions run counter to the City’s transportation and street design goals as laid out in the Climate Action Plan, and Vision Zero initiative?

At the end of the day, I would take everyone’s concerns and interests into consideration but I believe that with a little out of the box thinking, there is a creative solution that could address the concerns that counter the City’s goals. I would always uphold the goals of the Climate Action Plan. For example, if a group of businesses in La Jolla opposed a bike plan due to the removal of parking. I would work to implement demand responsive parking systems, find new, more efficient parking configurations that would allow for new bike facilities. (protected lanes!).

4) Multiple studies have shown that increased bicycle accessibility, is good for local businesses – and that this even holds true when on-street parking is reduced. How can the information gap between advocates and businesses be bridged to advance our common interests of safe, thriving neighborhoods? Further, at which point do you say to those who refuse to engage as responsible and reasonable partners in the community’s progress, that the cycle of arguments must end so we may act for the common good?

I have a dream, that with years of hard work to improve our mobility options that owning a car in order to get around San Diego wouldn’t be a necessity. I have always worked towards this vision of the future and I understand all the components that are needed in order to make it work. I would work with those in District 1 that don’t share my vision and help gain mutual understanding. I am dedicated to this cause and through my passion I want others to share in my vision for San Diego. It will require changes, but in the end it would lead to a better quality of life for everyone.

5) What (if any) plans and decisions, with respect to increasing cycling accessibility, have been made in the past by government agencies and elected officials that you disagree with? Did you make public that disagreement? And do you see an opportunity, if elected, to reverse it?

I have expressed disappointment in the ongoing failures of SANDAG to properly implement bicycle projects. I have stated my opinions on this publicly and I am constantly working on getting better regional bike planning to be improved. If elected, I would be very eager to serve on the SANDAG Board or at a minimum work directly with SANDAG to get the best outcomes possible. The Coastal Rail Trail is an excellent example of this!

6) Will you support the implementation of the 2011 San  Diego Bicycle Master Plan Update, including    budgetary requirements for its completion and success?

Yes, absolutely. It would be a priority of mine. For decades, the San Diego region has invested heavily in freeway infrastructure. It is time to heavily invest in alternatives to car travel, like bicycle facilities. As former appointed member of the City’s Bicycle Advisory Committee, I helped chair a subcommittee to create a Strategic Implementation Plan for the Bike Master Plan. I volunteered in the position Saturday mornings! If that isn’t dedication, I don’t know what is!

7) If you have one, share a favorite cycling memory – and let us know how it shapes your desire to see safe streets in San Diego for all residents, across generations?

The first time I biked to Ocean Beach along the San Diego River, I saw the cars speed by on the freeway. I was able to appreciate the birds and the river and the sunset while I slowly worked my way towards the ocean. I could feel the wind on my face and I experienced my environment as opposed to everyone speeding along not even knowing what they were missing. I want everyone to be able to slow down and enjoy the nature along a bike path. Everyone would be happier!

8) Finally – If elected, will you commit to meeting with BikeSD representatives on a regular basis to continue the dialog around improving all D1 neighborhoods, and making San Diego the world’s greatest city for cycling?

Absolutely!


2016 Election: Ray Ellis on Issues that Matter to BikeSD Supporters in District 1

Our board sent questionaires to candidates running for city council and we will be posting their responses here. Ray Ellis is running to replace termed out Councilmember Sherri Lightner who currently represents District 1.

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Ray Ellis. Image via Ellis' website.

1) How do you envision the growth of cycling in San Diego – be it for transportation, recreation, or otherwise?

Cycling is a big part of the culture in San Diego.  There are numerous cycling clubs and associations dedicated to promoting all aspects of the sport.  All trends indicate this interest and growth will continue.  Beyond the recreational aspects, cycling is part of our transportation options, quality of life, economic vitality and key to reaching our environmental objectives through the Climate Action Plan recently adopted.

2) What steps must be taken to ensure the success of San Diego’s “Vision Zero” goals?

It is important to pursue the ambitious goals of the “Vision Zero” to ensure the City can effectively reduce pedestrian, bicycle and other traffic fatalities.  City streets must be safe for all modes of transportation.  To effectively implement “Vision Zero” I will recommend the following.

1) Focus on investing in the priority corridors with the most traffic accidents as studied by Circulate San Diego.  Create a dashboard to track traffic data in these priority areas.

2) Provide an equal focus on all three components critical to an effective Vision Zero strategy: education, enforcement and engineering.  The City needs to collaborate with schools, non-profits, community planning groups and other members of the community to invest in public safety messaging to ensure the broader community understands how to safely share the road and learn how to appropriately use and interact with new multi-modal infrastructure.  The Department of Transportation and Storm Water needs to work closely with the San Diego Police Department to share and monitor traffic fatality and accident data to target enforcement in high-accident corridors.  There needs to be continued investment in engineering improvements as identified in the bike master plan and pedestrian master plan.

3) Train staff on “Complete Street” planning and design.

4) Develop a Transportation Master Plan, which will incorporate Vision Zero components and provide transportation priorities citywide.

5) Update the City’s Street Design Manual to incorporate new Vision Zero principles in striping roadways to provide for improved bike facilities.

6) Incorporate guidelines and practices from the National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) in the planning and design of projects.

3) Given the myriad of competing interests in D1 neighborhoods, how will you handle individuals and groups, alike, whose interests and actions run counter to the City’s transportation and street design goals as laid out in the Climate Action Plan, and Vision Zero initiative?

The two key components are education and collaboration.  I am an independent problem solver with a proven track record of volunteer, community and civic leadership.  As the volunteer Board Chair for Equinox Center, I spoke out in support of the Climate Action Plan and was very pleased to see the collaborative effort during the process.  As a volunteer member for the Del Mar Mesa Community Planning Board, we often see the conflict between the environmental community and mountain bike groups regarding accessibility especially within the Los Penasquitos Canyon Preserve.  My centrist approach and a willingness to work with others will ensure we get positive outcomes in District 1 and the City.

4) Multiple studies have shown that increased bicycle accessibility, is good for local businesses – and that this even holds true when on-street parking is reduced. How can the information gap between advocates and businesses be bridged to advance our common interests of safe, thriving neighborhoods? Further, at which point do you say to those who refuse to engage as responsible and reasonable partners in the community’s progress, that the cycle of arguments must end so we may act for the common good?

I have a successful and proven record of leading businesses, non-profit organizations and civic organizations.  In those leadership roles, I have been able to get individuals and groups to focus on positive outcomes by working together.  As San Diego continues to grow organically we need to be innovative and creative.  We have a great opportunity to improve our neighborhoods and small businesses by creating more walkable and bikeable communities.  We have successful models we can adopt in San Diego.  This coupled with activating currently underutilized spaces creates vibrant communities.  While volunteering at the Balboa Park Conservancy, we did this for the Plaza de Panama space in collaboration with the City, Southwest Airlines and Project for Public Spaces.  I am a big believer that we can do more of these public-private partnerships throughout the City.  I have been endorsed by every business organization that has done an endorsement.  I am supported by countless non-profit leaders who I have worked with over the last 2-decades.  I want to use this experience to bridge the gaps you are referencing.

5) What (if any) plans and decisions, with respect to increasing cycling accessibility, have been made in the past by government agencies and elected officials that you disagree with? Did you make public that disagreement? And do you see an opportunity, if elected, to reverse it?

My primary focus over the last decade has been volunteering in leadership roles with non-profits addressing many of the unmet needs of members of our community.  I am interested in learning more about cycling policies that are working and those that need to improved.

6) Will you support the implementation of the 2011 San  Diego Bicycle Master Plan Update, including    budgetary requirements for its completion and success?

I agree with the Bike Advisory Committee’s strategy to create and implement a plan that prioritizes projects in Vision Zero communities as well as historically underserved communities as defined by the Cal Enviro Screen.  As outlined, there are six high priority projects that meet both these criteria.  I am committed to ensuring the implementation of these six priority projects during my term.  I also support efforts to implement the Downtown Mobility Plan.

7) If you have one, share a favorite cycling memory – and let us know how it shapes your desire to see safe streets in San Diego for all residents, across generations?

When my fourteen year-old was about three, we were living in the Pacific Beach area.  Jake and I would spend hours almost daily riding throughout the beach area, stopping at parks like the one in south Mission and then a snack on the way home.  I was consulting and volunteering at the time and fortunately had the time for this morning ritual.

8) Finally – If elected, will you commit to meeting with BikeSD representatives on a regular basis to continue the dialog around improving all D1 neighborhoods, and making San Diego the world’s greatest city for cycling?

Yes, of course.  I value all points of view on issues and am interested in BikeSD’s perspective and expertise.  We have many great opportunities to protect and improve the quality of life in San Diego.  This is not only true in District 1, but throughout the City.

Thank you for the opportunity to respond to your Questionnaire.  I hope to have the opportunity to meet in person to discuss these and other issues.  Please contact me with any questions or thoughts.

 


2016 Election: Barbara Bry on Issues that Matter to BikeSD Supporters in District 1

Our board sent questionaires to candidates running for city council and we will be posting their responses here. Barbara Bry is running to replace termed out Councilmember Sherri Lightner who currently represents District 1.

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Barbara Bry. Image via Bry's website.

1) How do you envision the growth of cycling in San Diego – be it for transportation, recreation, or otherwise?

The City’s recent adoption of the Climate Action Plan mandates expanding mobility options from single-occupant cars to transit, walking and biking. We cannot meet the CAP’s mobility goals without making cycling an easy and safe mode of transportation whether it is for commuting, running errands, or recreation. We have agreed on the targets for 2020 and 2035 and we must work together to meet those targets.

Do you see cycling as a community builder?

Yes! A community is not just a collection of buildings but the people who live, work and play there. Active transportation, including biking, provides that human interaction that is such an important element in building community.

2) What steps must be taken to ensure the success of San Diego’s “Vision Zero” goals?

Too often San Diego makes grand announcements or adopts new policies that whither because there is no authentic follow-up and implementation. We can begin to meet those goals by focusing infrastructure dollars on our City’s most dangerous intersections. We have to prioritize San Diegans having safe routes to walk/bike to neighborhood stores, libraries, and parks as well as commute to work. While San Diego is still in era of limited revenue and a staggering infrastructure deficit, public health, safety and mobility must be prioritized.

3) Given the myriad of competing interests in D1 neighborhoods, how will you handle individuals and groups, alike, whose interests and actions run counter to the City’s transportation and street design goals as laid out in the Climate Action Plan, and Vision Zero initiative?

It is important that we continue to do outreach to all stakeholders in each community. The City has failed to do so in adopting the CAP, Vision Zero, and other master plans and policies. Worse, upon adoption, elected officials fail to be on the frontline to explain how those decisions will bring positive changes to our neighborhoods and prepare stakeholders before they are confronted by a specific project. The City must take the time to hear from everyone to properly vet implementation, and we must be flexible to hear their concerns, bend where possible, while moving forward. My staff and I will be a pro-active leader in those conversations.

4) Multiple studies have shown that increased bicycle accessibility, is good for local businesses – and that this even holds true when on-street parking is reduced. How can the information gap between advocates and businesses be bridged to advance our common interests of safe, thriving neighborhoods? Further, at which point do you say to those who refuse to engage as responsible and reasonable partners in the community’s progress, that the cycle of arguments must end so we may act for the common good?

I agree with the premise of your question. Further, I am heartened by changes in Sacramento that takes CEQA out of the approval and implementation of increasing bicycle accessibility. Again, it comes down to leadership. Leadership to have robust stakeholder input, listening to concerns, vetting every option, bending where possible, but we must move forward for the common good. In turn, I will need your help to balance the conversation; to elect pro-bicycle members to planning groups, BIDs, and CDCs; and, to identify ways to mitigate legitimate concerns.

5) What (if any) plans and decisions, with respect to increasing cycling accessibility, have been made in the past by government agencies and elected officials that you disagree with? Did you make public that disagreement? And do you see an opportunity, if elected, to reverse it?

* SANDAG funding and timing of active transportation projects

* SANDAG preference to run the Coastal Rail Trail up Rose Canyon instead of re-routing through UCSD

* continuing failure of City to implement cycling tracks (separate and protected bike lanes) and the city’s reliance on sharrows.

6) Will you support the implementation of the 2011 San  Diego Bicycle Master Plan Update, including    budgetary requirements for its completion and success?

Yes. The city must honor the adopted master plan. We are still operating in an era of limited revenue and a staggering infrastructure deficit; nevertheless, in a prudent fashion, we must implement the master plan.

7) If you have one, share a favorite cycling memory – and let us know how it shapes your desire to see safe streets in San Diego for all residents, across generations?

I am not the most athletic person, and I do not ride a bicycle regularly. One of my early cycling memories is learning to ride a bike in my neighborhood outside of Philadelphia where I grew up. I was very proud of my pink Schwinn with its straw basket. One of my most memorable rides was doing the 17-mile drive in Pebble Beach.

8) Finally – If elected, will you commit to meeting with BikeSD representatives on a regular basis to continue the dialog around improving all D1 neighborhoods, and making San Diego the world’s greatest city for cycling?

Yes. One of my staff will be a point person for active transportation and will monitor the Bicycle Advisory Committee. I will meet on a regular basis with advocates for active transportation.


2016 Election: Chris Ward on Issues that Matter to BikeSD Supporters in District 3

Our board sent questionaires to candidates running for city council and we will be posting their responses here. Christopher Ward is running against Anthony Bernal to replace Councilmember Todd Gloria who currently represents District 3.

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Chris Ward. Image via Ward's website.

1) How do you envision the growth of cycling in San Diego – be it for transportation, recreation, or otherwise? Do you see cycling as a community builder?

Investing in our active transportation network will result in the growth of cycling in San Diego for transportation, recreation, and result in community enhancements and small business success. We see in cities around the world that when pedestrian and bike improvements are made we see more activity on our main streets, businesses thrive, and neighbors interact with one another. There’s been fewer community building successes than recent CicloSDias events that brought out so many neighbors to enjoy their community in a new way.

2) What steps must be taken to ensure the success of San Diego’s “Vision Zero” goals?

Including pedestrian and bike improvements as part of the planning and funding for capital projects to make sure we have safe corridors. I will also be a constant and able advocate for my constituents that request sidewalk repairs, crosswalk

installations and other projects funded outside of the CIP system.

3) Given the myriad of competing interests in D3 neighborhoods, how will you handle individuals and groups, alike, whose interests and actions run counter to the City’s transportation and street design goals as laid out in the Climate Action Plan, and Vision Zero initiative?

I believe that the next City Councilmember from District 3 can provide leadership to bring stakeholders from initially disparate standpoints together and find solutions that result in safer and complete streets throughout our neighborhoods.

My staff and I will spend the time it takes to explain to business owners and others nervous of change how safer street infrastructure will benefit their businesses and neighborhoods. I will also leverage the relationships I have with supportive business owners to help them speak with credibility to their peers.

I believe much of the frustration around the planning and outreach for bike and pedestrian projects has come from long delays, and outreach missteps from SANDAG. My background in urban planning gives me the technical expertise and understanding to look at the data and understand all of the impacts for proposals being sold to the community. In terms of the Climate Action Plan, I will advocate for funding projects that implement the goals of the plan and many of those will be focused on bike and pedestrian improvements to allow D3 residents to use non-car modes to get around.

4) Multiple studies have shown that increased bicycle accessibility, is good for local businesses – and that this even holds true when on-street parking is reduced. How can the information gap between advocates and businesses be bridged to advance our common interests of safe, thriving neighborhoods? Further, at which point do you say to those who refuse to engage as responsible and reasonable partners in the community’s progress, that the cycle of arguments must end so we may act for the common good?

When you look at the data from other cities that have invested in bike networks it is clear they are successful at bringing new riders into the system and increasing business for small businesses on main streets. From Portland to Washington DC, people are getting out of their car, experiencing their neighborhoods, and supporting local business. These experiences need to be shared so the information gap does not result in rejection of projects that are great neighborhood investments. As a policy and planning wonk, I know the success stories and can help facilitate those conversations.

Public participation for planning transportation is essential. However, our processes would be improved if entities like SANDAG acted quickly and efficiently, with specific public timelines for reaching decisions. I will push that for transportation planning, and remind City and SANDAG staff not to repeat past mistakes.

5) What (if any) plans and decisions, with respect to increasing cycling accessibility, have been made in the past by government agencies and elected officials that you disagree with? Did you make public that disagreement? And do you see an opportunity, if elected, to reverse it?

I spoke at SANDAG in favor of the Transform Hillcrest plan – an example of the business community, advocates, and neighbors coming together to support a plan that would increase cycling accessibility, increase parking, and provide great public spaces. It was a lost opportunity to not move forward with that plan and we see now that even the parking losses that were initially reported were greatly decreased due to work by SANDAG and city staff.

6) Will you support the implementation of the Downtown Mobility Plan designed by CivicSD, including budgetary requirements for its completion and success?

Yes.

7) If you have one, share a favorite cycling memory – and let us know how it shapes your desire to see safe streets in San Diego for all residents, across generations?

Less of a memory and more about a hope – to be able to ride bikes around the neighborhood with my daughter Betty when she gets older. I am lucky to live in a safe pocket of University Heights with minimal car traffic but would not feel comfortable riding from our home to Balboa Park with her based on the current bike infrastructure. Prior to her joining our lives, I remember trying to bicycle to church one day along University Avenue between Vermont and 1st Avenue. We wouldn’t bring her along the same route today given our experience.

8) Finally – If elected, will you commit to meeting with BikeSD representatives on a regular basis to continue the dialog around improving all D3 neighborhoods, and making San Diego the world’s greatest city for cycling?

Yes and I will have a staff member in my office who will be a liaison to the cycling community.

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