2020 VOTE - North Park Planning Group

BikeSD Endorses Rise North Park Candidates for North Park Planning Group

We support these candidates for the Community Planning Groups (CPGs) in North Park and Uptown (Hillcrest, Mission Hills, and Bankers Hill) because CPGs have a powerful influence on many aspects of the built environment of our communities. In the past we have had bikeway projects die because CPG board members were resistant to approving these kinds of projects. In order to make our streets safer, we need to elect board members who will support Complete Streets and other projects that increase mobility options. Here are the candidates that will help make our communities better for pedestrians and families riding bicycles.

BikeSD has endorsed all the candidates running as collectively as "Rise North Park" running for election on March 17, 2020 for North Park Planning Group.  The Rise North Park Candidates are running on the values of transit choice and creating housing of all types, while supporting the growing economy in North Park. To be eligible to vote in the upcoming election North Park residents must have signed in to one North Park Planning Group Meeting in the past twelve months. The last meeting before the vote is this Tuesday, February 18, 2020.  If you support increased mobility options in North Park like 30th Street or the SANDAG Projects then come out to Waypoint Public this Tuesday at 6:30 and meet the Rise North Park Candidates before signing into the NPPG meeting next door.  Don't worry it only takes 10 minutes!

RISE NORTH PARK CANDIDATES:

Ginger Partyka

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I’ve been a homeowner and resident of North Park since 2015.  I’m a strong proponent and user of local businesses and hope to support a community framework in which those businesses can continue to thrive.  I’m a passionate advocate of reducing traffic, improving community interactions, and increasing affordable housing through increasing housing and transportation choice.  I love the atmosphere of our dense and vibrant community and want to support planning that furthers increased face-to-face interactions between North Park’s members.  I’m very excited about the opportunity to serve the North Park residents on the planning committee.

Beau Benko

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My name is Beau Benko and I’m running for the North Park Planning Committee because I want to support and represent North Park. There’s a lot I love already in North Park, from the community and the people to the businesses, and the spots to view a great sunset. But I believe North Park still has incredible potential for growth. I believe in more housing for more neighbors and I believe we need to work toward a world with no pedestrian deaths. I believe we can support more local businesses and that everyone benefits when multiple modes of transit are supported.

 

Rebecca Lieberman

I am running to be on the North Park Planning Committee because I want to become a more involved member of my vibrant North Park community. I live with my partner, Ben, and our sheepadoodle puppy, Woody, in the southwest corner of the neighborhood. We moved to San Diego when Ben received orders to the USS San Diego, stationed out of the 32nd Street Navy Base. Ben and I chose to live in North Park for many reasons: we love its historic homes, diversity of restaurants, and plethora of breweries. However, the key reason we chose North Park is because we could both bike to work and walk to dinner.

As a city planner by trade, I seek to live in and create vibrant and livable urban spaces. In my current role as a policy advisor at the San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce, I understand the importance of small businesses, affordable homes, and an array of transportation options to our regional economy. I believe North Park is one of the most unique neighborhoods in San Diego because of its strong local economy, walkable streets, and proximity to Balboa Park and I hope to use my seat on the planning committee to lift up and support the parts of the neighborhood that I love.

Jessica Ripper

I am running to be on the North Park Planning Committee I moved to San Diego six years ago, already passionate about building communities that are great places for diverse people to live, work, play, and learn. Since then, I’ve transitioned from a 15-year career working with nonprofits and philanthropy to a new role consulting on housing and community development. These experiences help me to explore ideas from multiple perspectives to help bring about solutions that meet current community needs while maintaining the flexibility to adapt to a changing environment. I’m also thrilled that my family will finally be moving into our home in the heart of North Park this summer.

Marissa Tucker

As an avid pedestrian, I’ve come to appreciate North Park’s craftsman’s, garden apartments, even its infamous Huffman 6-packs, and the new stark modern marvels: They all tell the story of a North Park that is always evolving. As we move toward the future we look to North Park’s past for guidance: it’s willingness to change in order to ensure that North Park remains a strong working and middle class neighborhood where families of all income levels can thrive.

As San Diego faces a housing crisis, we know that we need to ensure we’re building affordable housing for those just starting families and those who wish to retire in our amenities rich neighborhood. But we also face a climate crisis. As we transition away from fossil fuels, we need to ensure we create safe infrastructure to allow people to choose active transit options such as walking, biking, scooting, and busing. As the YIMBY Democratic San Diego club president and Rise North Park founder, I’m not satisfied with just voting, I’m committed to leading on these values.

Daniel Molitor

As an avid pedestrian, I’ve come to appreciate North Park’s I chose to make North Park my home after growing up in Indiana and spending five years in the Bay Area. I fell in love with North Park’s lively yet relaxed character and its wonderful vibes. As a progressive neighborhood, we should be leading the fight against climate change: We have to fight sprawl and long commutes, and that means building more homes near where the jobs are and where people want to be. We also need to make it easier to develop car-free habits of getting around. That means taking the opportunity when planning infrastructure and development to prioritize buses and protect people whether they’re walking, biking, scooting or skating. My vision of North Park preserves its vibes and essence while beautifying our built environment, cleaning the air, and improving the safety of our public spaces.


Donut Ride in support of City Council D3 candidate Chris Olsen

The BikeSD family met at Nomad Donuts, the first stop on a sweet bike ride for Chris Olsen, our endorsed District 3 City Council candidate. Who knew that D3 has the best donut shops in all of San Diego? Nomad Donuts (gourmet donuts inspired by the world yet created with local ingredients) in North Park has amazing donuts. A small business in North Park, Nomad Donuts is very supportive of creating more bike infrastructure in North Park. From Nomad we rode west on University to Texas (quick stop at Golden Donuts for a group shot) and on to the  new bus and bike lane on El Cajon Blvd. We rode over the wonderful Vermont Street Bridge (we need more bike and pedestrian bridges) and got on University Ave to get to our next stop, Copper Top Coffee & Donuts (where donuts are made fresh every 30 minutes).

After more donuts and coffee, we rode down First Ave to Curlew and then on to Reynard Way.  Reynard Way has great potential to be a north/south connector and part of complete bike network. Reynard Way has light traffic and is wide enough to accommodate at least a buffered lane and maybe even a protected lane. It connects to Little Italy and our last stop Devil’s Dozen Donuts (carefully curated selections of donuts made using only the highest quality ingredients available.)

In Little Italy, people riding bikes have a distinct advantage when it comes to parking. We parked more than a dozen bicycles right in front and there is no way you could park a dozen cars in front of any business in Little Italy. Devil’s Dozen has an amazing second floor with a spectacular view to the bay and really cool furniture and a little picnic table for kids. And super donuts with shiny dripping glaze.

Why does BikeSD support Chris Olsen for City Council D3? Because he has the experience to get the job done. As a City Budget Analyst for six years with a Masters in Public Administration, Chris is also a lecturer of fiscal policy at the School of Public Affairs at San Diego State University. Chris Olsen has the experience and skill set needed to deliver results. He has seen first-hand where the City has fallen short and how we can spend limited resources most effectively. He listens to us. Bike the Vote. Vote for Chris Olsen. 

 

 


Gilman entrance of UCSD

Letter on new UCSD campus policy on micromobility devices

Dear Vice Chancellor Matthews,

We appreciate the opportunity to provide feedback on UCSD’s proposed campus policy on the use of micromobility devices, announced on November 5, 2019 [1]. The policy would establish several new rules and regulations regarding the operation of scooters, bicycles, and other small devices on UCSD campus. The need to create a safe environment for all members of the campus community and UCSD visitors is clear: with expected growth reaching 65,000-plus students, staff and faculty, getting into and around campus will be increasing complex. This policy represents an important opportunity to set expectations of campus users — through commonsense stipulations such as being able to operate safely under different conditions and yielding right of way to pedestrians — but could be expanded to help address many underlying issues that result in conflicts on a daily basis.

First, well-recognized principles of urban infrastructure design inform us that providing safe facilities where people want to walk and ride is vastly more effective and equitable than outlawing and diverting these modes [2]. Modern urban transportation plans thus aim to provide balance among the various uses of public roadways, and in particular separate traffic moving at vastly different speeds, such as through the use of off-street paths and protected bicycle lanes. Currently, UCSD campus facilities do not provide a level of ease of circulation for people regardless of whether they are walking, riding or biking. Most destinations are not connected by bike paths where riders can avoid mingling with pedestrians, and main desire lines either prohibit riding or are shared use without any signed or designated areas for riders. Construction activity throughout campus is not fully mitigated, leaving narrower and less convenient paths for everyone. We therefore urge the administration to adopt proactive infrastructural approaches to provide physical and/or marked separation between pedestrian and micromobility modes on campus, facilitating all desire lines.

Second, due to the sprawling footprint of campus, entry points via public transit are far from many campus destinations. While parking is a perennial complaint, it remains the case that most buildings have parking options within five minutes walk, while bus stops of high-volume routes can be 15 or more minutes away. As the growing community opts to take public transit, using micromobility to and from these entry points will be increasingly attractive, adding to the complexities with enforcing restrictions on their use. The trolley extension will only intensity this conflict: the nearest stop to The Village dormitory, Pepper Canyon, will be more than 25 minutes away. We propose that safe and convenient paths for micromobility are established from all existing and future transit entry points to all major campus destinations, taking advantage of both perimeter and throughcampus routes. 

Finally, major roads surrounding campus for the most part lack adequate facilities for micromobility users. Genesee Ave, Gilman Drive, and N. Torrey Pines Road, among others, have dangerous, unprotected lanes next to fast-moving traffic. The UTC area, where a large fraction of off-campus students live, is only two miles from campus and yet lacks safe routes to get to class. In spite of these drawbacks, the University community sees rates of bicycle use over two times the city and county of San Diego [2]. This need must be met with sustained support and encouragement for people to leave their cars at home when commuting to campus. Best practice for roads with speeds regularly exceeding 25 mph and 6000 cars per day is to establish protected bicycle lanes with vertical barriers or raised elevation from motor vehicle traffic [3]. We urge UCSD to work with the City of San Diego and SANDAG to create safe, protected micromobility routes for all ages and abilities to all destinations within at least two miles of campus. 

Let us reiterate that we strongly support ensuring the safety of all people traveling around campus. We believe this can be done in a non-punitive manner that creates and reinforces a welcoming environment for everyone to commute to and around campus via a range of alternative transportation modes. We look forward to working with you to achieve this vision. 

Sincerely,

Michael Davidson, Assistant Professor, UC San Diego
Paul Jamason, IT Services, UC San Diego; Board Member, BikeSD

On behalf of BikeSD, an independent, non-governmental, nonprofit advocacy organization. Our mission: To establish San Diego as a world-class bicycling city and create a more livable urban community by promoting everyday riding and advocating for bicycling infrastructure. https://bikesd.org/ 

 

References

[1]: “Proposed Addition to UC San Diego Policy and Procedure Manual (PPM).” November 2019. UC San Diego. http://adminrecords.ucsd.edu/ppm/micromobility.html

[2]: Toole, Jennifer, & Bettina Zimny. “Transportation Planning Handbook, Ch. 16: Bicycle and Pedestrian Facilities.” Federal Highway Administration, US Department of Transportation, Washington, DC. https://nacto.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Transportation-Planning-Handbook-Bicycle-and-Pedestrian-Facilities.pdf

[3]: University Community Plan Update: Existing Conditions Summary. April 2018. City of San Diego. https://www.sandiego.gov/sites/default/files/final_university_cpu_ecr_report.pdf

[4]: Designing for All Ages & Abilities: Contextual Guidance for High-Comfort Bicycle Facilities. December 2017. National Association of City Transportation Officials. https://nacto.org/wpcontent/uploads/2017/12/NACTO_Designing-for-All-Ages-Abilities.pdf


2020 SD City Council District 7 Candidate Responses

2020 City Council Questionnaire - District 7: McIntyre, Wheatcroft

2020 SD City Council District 7 Candidate Responses

 


Candidate: Monty A. McIntyre

 

1) What are your top 3 priorities for improving the biking experience in District 7 for residents and families?

1. Maintain bike lanes so they are free of potholes, ruts or significant cracks.
2. Coordinate restriping when streets are resurfaced.
3. Support the continuing construction of proposed bike lanes.

 

2) San Diego’s Bicycle Master Plan needs updating and projects need prioritizing in order to create a complete bicycle network. A large number of street resurfacing projects need to be re striped with bicycle infrastructure. How would you propose to fund the full build-out of the bicycle network needed to achieve the Vision Zero goals and meet the Climate Action Plan mode share targets?

We need to make the project approval process more predictable, faster and customer-friendly.
We will need to find new revenue sources to build-out the bicycle network.

 

3) Transportation is the largest source of San Diego’s greenhouse gas emissions (55%). The City’s Climate Action Plan bicycle mode share goals are 6% of commuter trips by 2020 and 18% by 2035, from about 1% today. What steps will you take to make sure these goals are met or exceeded?

We need to creatively look for ways to incentivize people to move to neighborhoods where they can work, work at home, or work at a place close to their home that they can bike to.

 

4) Safe bike lanes often face opposition due to slower road speeds or reduced street parking. How would you work with the community to address concerns without compromising safety or delaying bike infrastructure in the name of consensus?

We need to educate our citizens about the benefits of bike lanes and using bikes for transportation as an alternative to cars. Also, we need to make the project approval process more predictable, faster and customer-friendly, while ensuring all impacted residents have an opportunity to be heard.

 

5) Please share a memorable experience(s) you have of bicycling.

When I was in college, a firefighter friend named Ken, who rode his bike to work every day, suggested that we go on a bike ride from where I lived near Avocado Boulevard in La Mesa to Auga Caliente Hot Springs. Thinking I was in great shape because I exercised and ran regularly, I agreed. I rode my bike a little to get ready, but not regularly like Ken did. I had no idea, however, what I was getting myself into!
One weekend morning we made the ride. We rode from La Mesa up to Julian. There were many times going up the mountain to Julian that I had to stop and rest. I wondered if I would ever make it. I hung in there, Ken was patient with me, and we ultimately made it to Julian. We then rode full speed down Banner Grade to get to Auga Caliente Hot Springs. That was a blast! I don’t think I’ve ever gone so fast on a bike! By the time we made it to Auga Caliente Hot Springs I was exhausted. We enjoyed camping there for the weekend, but we decided to put our bikes in the truck and enjoy the drive home when we returned to San Diego!

 


Candidate: Wendy Wheatcroft (ENDORSED BY BIKESD)

 

1) What are your top 3 priorities for improving the biking experience in District 7 for residents and families?

  • Expanding Vision Zero street, sidewalk, and intersection safety surveys to include and emphasize safety improvements at the network-scale, to create Vision Zero Neighborhoods.
  • Coordinating the City of San Diego, San Diego Unified School District, and MTS to create an enhanced Safe Routes to School vision.
  • Implementing a “Twenty is Plenty” campaign, while improving the built environment with significant traffic calming, to slow and divert traffic from neighborhood streets, and promoting travel-alternatives to cars, which are the number-one danger to bicyclists.

 

2) San Diego’s Bicycle Master Plan needs updating and projects need prioritizing in order to create a complete bicycle network. A large number of street resurfacing projects need to be restriped with bicycle infrastructure. How would you propose to fund the full build-out of the bicycle network needed to achieve the Vision Zero goals and meet the Climate Action Plan mode share targets?

  • Repeal the People’s Ordinance. An approximately $50 million influx to the City general fund would present fresh bonding opportunity to create sustainable, long-term infrastructure for current and future generations.
  • Street infrastructure revenue from increasing the Transient Occupancy Tax should be directed first to improving the material condition of streets that also are identified for new cycling facilities in the Bicycle Master Plan.
  • Future state and federal transit revenue assistance looks likely to come with strings attached related to increasing housing. Master planning neighborhoods must include Complete Streets requirements that ensure a transit station/bicycling infrastructure “hub and spoke” make-up at community scale as a community benefit.

 

3) Transportation is the largest source of San Diego’s greenhouse gas emissions (55%). The City’s Climate Action Plan bicycle mode share goals are 6% of commuter trips by 2020 and 18% by 2035, from about 1% today. What steps will you take to make sure these goals are met or exceeded?

  • Implementing my previously listed top three priorities to unlock the latent demand for active transportation.
  • Lobby to ensure SANDAG’s “5 Big Moves” once and for all includes the full funding and implementation of the SANDAG Regional Bike Plan Early Action Program.
  • Reconstitute and fund the Civic Innovation Lab in the Mayor’s office to identify pedestrian thoroughfare, plaza, and cycling superblock opportunities to promote active transportation.
  • Create and incentivize active transportation, not just through the built environment, but in a civic credit program for reduced fare access to MTS, Balboa Park museums, the San Diego Zoo, and other institutions throughout the city.

 

4) Safe bike lanes often face opposition due to slower road speeds or reduced street parking. How would you work with the community to address concerns without compromising safety or delaying bike infrastructure in the name of consensus?

  • First, reducing roads speeds to improve safety is foundational to better neighborhoods and business districts. I will say so explicitly over and over again. It’s a feature, not a bug of what these projects are trying to do.
  • We must educate the public, not just on outreach as it pertains to what we want to do here, but what has been successful at improving the quality of life in other cities. Education is the most effective tool for changing hearts and minds. Our city needs to meet our Climate Action goals, and part of that relies on making bicycling safer for our residents. The safety of the community comes before the ability to drive to your destination 30-seconds faster.
  • It will be important to present proposed changes that may inconvenience residents and solutions to the above-named objections at that same time, early in the process, and build consensus across all stakeholders.

 

5) Please share a memorable experience(s) you have of bicycling.

I love renting bikes and riding in other cities. Most recently, I took a night time bike tour of Washington, DC, this summer while I was there for a conference. It was incredible to have such a different perspective of all the monuments. I also love a good bike ride on a warm summer night.

A couple of years ago when I took my oldest daughter to San Francisco for her 6th grade trip, we rented bikes one day and rode around the entire city. The end goal was to ride over the Golden Gate Bridge, but by the time we got to the bridge, we were so exhausted from riding all day long that we could not continue. However, we saw more of the city that I had seen in an entire lifetime. Even though she complained most of the way, she still talks about it and how much fun we had. The bridge will be for another trip!

My family loves riding bikes and I know many others do too. I am fully committed to improving bike routes across San Diego.

 



District 5 questionnaire banner

2020 City Council Questionnaire - District 5: von Wilpert, Wang

 


Candidate: Marni von Wilpert —

 

1) What are your top 3 priorities for improving the biking experience in District 5 for residents and families?

My top 3 priorities to improve the biking experience are (1) building upon the existing infrastructure to increase the amount of dedicated and protected bike lanes, (2) ensuring that our transit hubs have adequate space for bike storage so people can take their bikes to transit centers, and (3) promoting biking as a mode of transportation in addition to a recreational activity.

 

2) San Diego’s Bicycle Master Plan needs updating and projects need prioritizing in order to create a complete bicycle network. A large number of street resurfacing projects need to be restriped with bicycle infrastructure. How would you propose to fund the full build-out of the bicycle network needed to achieve the Vision Zero goals and meet the Climate Action Plan mode share targets?

I view the bicycle network as a key part of our City’s infrastructure. As a deputy city attorney, I see lawsuits every day that cost our City much more to repair our broken infrastructure than had we invested in the front to properly maintain our streets, sidewalks, and storm drains. When I’m elected, I will prioritize fixing our most vulnerable infrastructure problems first that could subject the City to the greatest liability, so that we save money on unnecessary lawsuits that we can invest in important priorities such as the bicycle network in our City. 

 

3) Transportation is the largest source of San Diego’s greenhouse gas emissions (55%). The City’s Climate Action Plan bicycle mode share goals are 6% of commuter trips by 2020 and 18% by 2035, from about 1% today. What steps will you take to make sure these goals are met or exceeded?

Making sure the City meets its Climate Action Plan goals is one of the main reasons I am running for office. I take the 110 Express Bus to work from Scripps Ranch to downtown, and I see how we can improve service and accessibility for commuters. I will prioritize making sure our City has a world class transportation system, to get cars and trucks off the road and reduce our greenhouse gas emissions.

 

4) Safe bike lanes often face opposition due to slower road speeds or reduced street parking. How would you work with the community to address concerns without compromising safety or delaying bike infrastructure in the name of consensus?

In many instances, street parking does not need to be reduced to accommodate a protected bike lane, which is a great win-win for motorists and cyclists alike. One of my important campaign priorities is ensuring that people have options for transportation, and that we meet our environmental protection goals. I will work to help educate the community about the importance of alternate transportation options

 

5) Please share a memorable experience(s) you have of bicycling.

I first learned to ride a bike at Miramar Lake in Scripps Ranch where I grew up. I biked all throughout college at UC Berkeley as my primary mode of transportation, and I didn’t even own a car then. When I worked in Congress in Washington D.C., I commuted on a bike every day using the Capital Bike Share bikes located throughout the district. I highly value biking as a favorite recreational activity, mode of transportation, and just plain fun!

 


Candidate: Isaac Wang

What are your top 3 priorities for improving the biking experience in District 5 for residents and families?


1.
Mobility hubs connected by bus-only lanes (Biking serves as the last mile solution in a sprawled district)

I do believe biking should be the dominant mode of transportation to solve the last mile problem for transit stations (mobility hubs). Given the location of District 5 and it’s distance from our major job centers (La Jolla, Kearny Mesa, and Downtown), I don’t believe biking can be the near term solution for travel to jobs.

I’ll discuss bike superhighways in point #2. But I do think we can reduce most of the 5-10 minute trips (local services, parks, libraries) by switching to bike.

We should be creating Class IV separated bikeways in the minor arterials and collector roads (Class III and Class IV road classifications). Doing this would make traveling to transit stations much more feasible by bike. We also need to ensure bike storage at all transit stations.

With that being said, City Council makes decisions for entire city, not just their own district.
In denser districts like 3 + 9 + 7, we should take away lanes from cars and create much more extensive networks of Class IV bikeways in the arterials and collectors and even the neighborhood roads.

I will unequivocally vote yes on any protected bike lane or separated bikeway, even if it makes the city council member in that respective district unhappy. Don’t expect an urbanist in a blue city council district. Not everyone gets it.

2. Bike Superhighways (aka Bike Freeways)

I believe we need bike superhighways as a major transit priority and in the pipeline of projects.
We’re aware of how long these projects can take, and how terrible CalTrans is.
These projects needed to have been in the pipeline 20 years ago, but here we are.

I’m going to aggressively push for Bike Superhighways like no previous Councilmember ever has.
This doesn’t need any road widening! We need to take lanes away from cars, reallocate them to bicycles, and create physical separators.

These super highways need to connect both mobility hubs + dense residential areas to dense job centers.

In my ideal configuration, bike superhighways (if using highway lanes reallocated from cars) ought to be buffered by a physical barrier and a bus-only lane. Get me as far away from a car as possible.

||||| Travel Lanes ||||| Bus-only Lane ||||| Bike Superhighway |||||

Exit lanes might be a little tricky, but we’d need some bike traffic lights and use of shoulders.

There’s additional places where I’d like to see a ban on cars and a comprehensive bikeway network: Gaslamp, Little Italy, Park Blvd, Liberty Station, Point Loma

3. Creating disincentives for driving

Contrary to many elected officials and candidates who are cautious with their language to not upset drivers, I do believe we need a war on cars.

I’m very vocal about the war on cars. If we don’t reduce GHG emissions, our planet is going to suffer catastrophic consequences. This is scientific consensus.

We need to ensure there is no more free parking. We need congestion pricing. We need to reduce lanes. We need to aggressively shrink the footprint of cement in our cities.
We need an aggressive policy to convert parking lots and roads into something else. I believe the term is “Street Vacations”.

 

Question 2:  San Diego’s Bicycle Master Plan needs updating and projects need prioritizing in order to create a complete bicycle network. A large number of street resurfacing projects need to be restriped with bicycle infrastructure. How would you propose to fund the full build-out of the bicycle network needed to achieve the Vision Zero goals and meet the Climate Action Plan mode share targets?

Answer: Any way possible
Where there’s a will, there’s a way.
If we can find hundreds of millions for a stadium or convention center, we can find a way for anything.
It’s rarely a matter of not enough money, it’s a matter of priorities.

If I can re-divert funds from car infrastructure, I will.
If I have to use money from capital improvement funds.
If I have use money from the gas tax, I will.
If I have to raise taxes through a ballot measure, I will.
If I have to sell lottery tickets to create funds for bicycle infrastructure, I will.

 

Question 3: Transportation is the largest source of San Diego’s greenhouse gas emissions (55%). The City’s Climate Action Plan bicycle mode share goals are 6% of commuter trips by 2020 and 18% by 2035, from about 1% today. What steps will you take to make sure these goals are met or exceeded?

I think those goals are terrible and underwhelming.
The city with the best weather ought to have 25% cycling within 10 years, and 50% within 20 years.
This is doable, but you have to DESIGN for it and fight for it. I outlined in my top 3 priorities how to do it.
I think every city council staff needs an urban planner / designer on the team.

If you really wanted to increase mode-share, you have to create disincentives for driving as I mentioned in #3 above.

Every able-bodied City or County employee should be required to commute by transit or bike or walking. Or get rid of parking garages for city and county.

That will dramatically increase the sense of urgency to improve infrastructure for cycling and bus.
I will aggressively push for disincentives for driving. And I KNOW you know I will.

 

4) Safe bike lanes often face opposition due to slower road speeds or reduced street parking. How would you work with the community to address concerns without compromising safety or delaying bike infrastructure in the name of consensus?

We can significantly increase parking in a neighborhood by using angled parking instead of parallel. It gets a road diet in there and automatically serves as a traffic calming measure.
Slower road speeds is the point. I want it slower, because cars kill 30,000 people a year.

If they complain about a loss of parking, pair it with enough angled parking in nearby streets to compensate. If you have to walk a little, deal with it.

We may have to add some drop off zones for disabled folks; that’s always a legitimate concern.
But if you’re able bodied and can walk, you get zero sympathy from me.

 

Question 5: Please share a memorable experience(s) you have of bicycling.

Vienna, Austria
I rode down a mountain and cycled along a river surrounded by restaurants and public orchestras and people enjoying public spaces.

Do I want America to look like Europe? Hell yes.

There is nothing edifying about designing our cities for cars and having our cities look like cement jungles with gigantic billboards and strip malls.

Cities are best enjoyed and explored by bike. You can see much more than walking, but not have to be in a stupid car.

Urban design is key to all of this. Support a city council member who gets it.