BikeSD 2018 Election Endorsements

BikeSD sent questionnaires regarding positions and priorities on bicycle infrastructure and other bicycle issues to all candidates running for City Council. Neither candidates for District 2 and District 6, and Antonio Martinez from District 8 did not return our questionnaire. The following candidates are endorsed by BikeSD.

Nathan Fletcher for County Supervisor Read our full endorsement post here.

Monica Montgomery for City Council District 4 will advocate for funding of bicycle infrastructure and traffic calming projects to improve safety for all users of the street. She will fight for a comprehensive local and regional bikeway network. Her community connections in D4 are strong and her understanding of the importance of bicycle infrastructure will help increase bicycle mode share. “Monica Montgomery grew up in City Council District Four. A true policy wonk, she is the perfect combination of knowledge and passion. A native San Diegan, Monica’s legal career has been dedicated to the improvement and uplifting of the city of San Diego as a whole and the city’s Fourth City Council District.”

READ MONTGOMERY'S QUESTIONNAIRE

Vivian Moreno for City Council District 8  The South Bay community representative answered our questionnaire and indicated that the "Council must actively prioritize CAP related infrastructure projects within the budget. Building high priority bike infrastructure projects is the only way the City will meet the 2020 goal of 6%." District 8 which includes Barrio Logan, Greater Logan Heights, San Ysidro and Otay Mesa neighborhoods has great potential to be bicycle friendly. Moreno will continue the work of her former employer, Councilman David Alvarez, who was frequently seen on a bicycle around the district.

Vivian Moreno believes that "electricity-powered bicycles are the future, especially in mountainous regions such as ours. E-bikes can provide the necessary assistance to go uphill, even for those who suffer from poor conditioning. That is why I want to explore the possibility of adding more e-bikes within the City, and building the necessary infrastructure such as docking stations to ensure the bikes can service the community."

READ MORENO'S QUESTIONNAIRE

Why vote?

Every politician will claim to love and like and support all sorts of things. But there is nothing they love more than staying in office and being in power. And their power is only checked by you – when you vote and when you vote with purpose to keep them accountable and vote on policies that make a positive difference to your community. This gives them less room to wiggle away from commitments promised to the communities they serve. So for every time you have posted a rant or read a frustration on social media or wanted and demanded change – this is where it makes a difference: VOTE. If you can’t vote or have already voted, tell your friends and family to vote too. Bicycling makes our neighborhoods better for everyone. Including the haters. So VOTE. As an advocacy organization, our strength only comes from you. So again: VOTE.

Don’t know where to vote? Find your polling place here. Ask for a provisional ballot if you are turned away at the ballot. BikeSD Inc, is a registered 501(c)(4)


2018 District 8 City Council Questionnaire: Vivian Moreno

Q: Transportation is the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (55%) in San Diego. The City’s Climate Action Plan bicycle mode share goals are 6% of commuter trips by 2020 and 18% by 2035, from 1% today. How will you ensure these mode share goals are achieved?

A: The answer is simple. The Council must actively prioritize CAP related infrastructure projects within the budget. Building high priority bike infrastructure projects is the only way the City will meet the 2020 goal of 6%. The funding exists- it just needs to be allocated to projects that will help achieve CAP goals. Additionally, the City needs to plan for where the mode share increases will come from. Right now, as the City approves Community Plan Updates, the updates brought forward thus far have not included measures that meet that 6% goal. The discouraging thing is that some of these plans- North Park, Uptown- were areas where the goal is achievable because they are close to centers of employment and are walkable neighborhoods. If the City does not intend on meeting CAP goals within each community plan update, then they need to release a citywide strategy that shows where the increases in biking, walking and public transit will be. I intend to push for that as a City Councilmember.

Q: The City of San Diego’s Bicycle Master Plan has been repeatedly delayed.  How would you secure funding and ensure build-out?

A: The funding of the items above is really a matter of Council priority. During the annual budget process, the City Council actively chooses to fund or not fund many projects and programs. Ultimately, the City Council has the final say in adopting the annual budget. Standing firm with my colleagues on the Council that increased park space or bike infrastructure projects are built is the only way to accomplish this. This means that we cannot allow items to remain in the budget that are needless or simply vanity projects of the current administration. For instance, in the FY18 budget- which saw cuts to some areas- included $5M for a special election that will not take place. This funding could have built parks, repaired walkways, or helped clean up contaminated areas that flow into our storm drains. Working collaboratively with my colleagues and the Mayor, I aim to build coalitions that can withstand the effects of petty politics and put funding critical infrastructure needs above funding special interest desires.

Q: Safe bike lanes are often opposed by residents due to slower road speeds or reduced street parking.  How would you work with the community to address concerns - without compromising safety or delaying bike infrastructure in the name of consensus?

A: There must be increased density in areas that have public transportation or are close to areas of employment. If people are able to live where using public transportation is convenient they will use it. If people feel safe using their bike to travel in their community- they will travel that way instead of getting in a car to go a few miles. We can’t expect that most people will go out of their way to do these things, but if we, as decision makers in the City, provide the construction of needed infrastructure and utilize land use planning with foresight, people will begin to get out of their cars and use alternative modes of transportation.

Q: What are your top 3 priorities for improving the biking experience in your Council District for residents and families?

A: Ensure existing bike lanes are maintained

I have been monitoring the SANDAG Regional Bike Map over the past few years, and I am encouraged by the amount of bike lanes being added to our infrastructure. Now we have to ensure these roads are maintained, and well advertised so both residents and visitors can take full advantage.

Exploring E-bikes, and adding infrastructure to support more electrical bikes

I believe electricity-powered bicycles are the future, especially in mountainous regions such as ours. E-bikes can provide the necessary assistance to go uphill, even for those who suffer from poor conditioning. That is why I want to explore the possibility of adding more e-bikes within the City, and building the necessary infrastructure such as docking stations to ensure the bikes can service the community.

Provide more bike lanes whenever City roads are constructed or expanded

Traffic continues to grow as our City population increases. As we build new roads, and increase capacity of our existing ones, we need to future-proof our streets by adding bike lanes that can help mitigate some of those traffic increases. One of those streets is Dairy Mart road, which I want to expand from two lanes to four.

Q: Please share a memorable experience(s) you have of bicycling.

My favorite experience within the City is the ride from Coronado, down the Silver Strand and arriving for well-earned fresh glass of horchata once we reach the taco shops on Saturn Boulevard.


2018 District 4 City Council Questionnaire: Monica Montgomery

Q: Transportation is the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (55%) in San Diego. The City’s Climate Action Plan bicycle mode share goals are 6% of commuter trips by 2020 and 18% by 2035, from 1% today.  How will you ensure these mode share goals are achieved?

A:

  • First, support projected bike projects (many projects never get approved in the approval process, or get derailed by politicians and special interests).
  • Second, advocate for more bike paths in district 4, and get community input on where bike lanes are most needed.
  • Invest in bike infrastructure near transit to fill the first and last mile gap.
  • Make sure that district 4 gets the funding for infrastructure it needs. Biking infrastructure is often associated with higher income communities where biking is seen as leisure. In communities like south east, many of the residents rely on active transport for everyday commuting. It is important that they also have access to safe transportation.

Q: The City of San Diego’s Bicycle Master Plan has been repeatedly delayed.  How would you secure funding and ensure build-out?

A: The Master Plan needs to be a higher priority. It may be possible to take parts of the plan and pair projects with other projects that already have funding. Either way, we can look to other funding sources, such as SANDAG, to advocate for additional funding.

Q: Safe bike lanes are often opposed by residents due to slower road speeds or reduced street parking.  How would you work with the community to address concerns - without compromising safety or delaying bike infrastructure in the name of consensus?

A: Since I was born and raised in the community, I have the relationships to come to consensus. Bike paths and traffic calming are in the best interest of all residents. They make our streets safer to navigate for everyone 8 to 80, not just those that are fortunate enough to drive cars. We will continue to educate community members about the importance of bike safety. Biking infrastructure is also good for all residents, not just the ones that bike. Streets that are safe for bikes, are also safer for pedestrians and cars.

Q: What are your top 3 priorities for improving the biking experience in your Council District for residents and families?

A:

  • Advocate for funding to complete bike projects in the areas that are the most dangerous for pedestrians and bikers.
  • Support trail connectivity through the Chollas Creek to Bayshore Bikeway Path Project, which affects the residents of District 4.
  • Build on a comprehensive local and regional bikeway network.

Q: Please share a memorable experience(s) you have of bicycling.

A: I love biking at the beach. My dear friend and former roommate was moving out of the state of California and talked me into renting a bike and riding at mission beach. We had a lot of fun, and I found it very relaxing.


2018 District 4 City Council Questionnaire: Myrtle Cole

Q: Transportation is the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions (55%) in San Diego. The City’s Climate Action Plan bicycle mode share goals are 6% of commuter trips by 2020 and 18% by 2035, from 1% today.  How will you ensure these mode share goals are achieved?

A: As the Council President and member of the SANDAG Board I have worked with my colleagues to ensure that the Imperial Avenue Bikeway Project continues to move forward with community input. This project is part of the $200 million Regional Bike Plan Early Action Program. It will help create safer streets for people who walk, bike, drive, and take transit in the Southeastern San Diego Community. The 3-mile bikeway will provide improvements along Imperial Avenue between 17th Street and 47th Street. Potential project features include high visibility crosswalks, curb extensions, raised crosswalks, separated and buffered bike lanes and shared lane markings. These walking and biking enhancements will improve safety for all roadway users.

Q: The City of San Diego’s Bicycle Master Plan has been repeatedly delayed.  How would you secure funding and ensure build-out?

A: In July the Council unanimously approved a Strategic Implementation Plan for the Bicycle Master Plan. In addition to seeking grants and other funding that doesn’t come from the General Fund, I support the Council making funding for the Bicycle Master Plan a high priority and will include it in my list of high priority items for the budget.

Q: Safe bike lanes are often opposed by residents due to slower road speeds or reduced street parking.  How would you work with the community to address concerns - without compromising safety or delaying bike infrastructure in the name of consensus?

A: Working with the community, the Southeastern San Diego Community Plan and the Encanto Neighborhood Community has found consensus on a shared vision for more pedestrian and bike friendly neighborhoods that will make walking and biking more convenient. This is reflected in the Imperial Avenue Bikeway Project.

Q: What are your top 3 priorities for improving the biking experience in your Council District for residents and families?

A: Slowing traffic down in neighborhood streets, installing sidewalks and traffic calming devices, improving the safety of our intersections, and ensuring the Imperial Bikeway Project is constructed.

Q: Please share a memorable experience(s) you have of bicycling.

A: One of my fondest memories related to biking is being allowed to help paint the first green bike lanes in my district in 2013 along University Avenue.

 


2018 District 4 County Supervisor Endorsement

We are far past seeking consensus solutions.” — Nathan Fletcher

Nathan FletcherIn 2012, Nathan Fletcher released a bicycle plan as part of his campaign for Mayor of San Diego. It was a clear moment signaling bicycling has become part of the local political discussion. The competing candidates were forced to follow his lead and address active transportation. In the past 6 years, San Diego has created many plans for safer streets. However, we need more leadership like the kind Fletcher can provide to implement plans on our streets.

In 2018, Fletcher’s leadership will be needed. As Fletcher highlighted in his answers to the our BikeSD questionnaire, recent state legislation, AB805, has given San Diego the opportunity to break free from of its autocentric past. County Supervisors hold important board seats on Metropolitan Transit System (MTS) and San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG).  Any potential ballot measure by either of this agencies need to support active transportation. Nathan’s consistent support for bicycles would be a welcome voice for change on those boards. As a reminder, Fletcher is running to replace the primary architect of the Hillcrest Gap in the Uptown bikeway. BikeSD agrees with Fletcher that San Diego is “past seeking consensus solutions“ in implementing plans for safe streets.  

Bike San Diego proudly endorses Nathan Fletcher for District 4 County Supervisors. Please visit his website, volunteer and donate to support his campaign. 

BikeSD Questionnaire – Nathan Fletcher

Do you have memorable experiences or memories while riding a bike?

Two experiences come to mind when I think of my most memorable moments on a bicycle. The first, teaching my two boys how to ride a bike, encouraging them to explore and live an active, environmentally conscious lifestyle. We frequently all head out on cycling adventures and really enjoy the family time on bikes! Another memorable experience for me is when I took part in the Iron Man competition. The grueling contest challenged my physical limits and showed me how to continue to push myself. I arrived at this goal after suffering a devastating injury while on active duty in the Marine Corps. Cycling was key to my recover and progressing from learning to walk again to finishing the Ironman was a great feat!

SANDAG’s failed Measure A and its reform under AB805 have put transportation issues at the forefront of San Diego politics. What is your vision for transportation in San Diego County, and how does active transportation fit into it?

For years we have had an ineffective, backwards looking SANDAG board. Now through AB805, alternative forms of transportation, including all forms of active transportation, will have a greater opportunity to move to the forefront of San Diego County’s scope. Active transportation should always be at the forefront of future transportation infrastructure discussion. Not only does active transportation, such as cycling, promote more active and healthy lifestyles, it is also environmentally conscious. Once elected to the Board, I will make sure that our citizens have access to enhanced bike and active transportation infrastructure. We need to make biking a safer easier choice for San Diegans.

As county supervisor, you may have the opportunity to serve on the boards of MTS or SANDAG. (How) would you advocate for SANDAG’s bicycle early action program, which has experienced significant delays? Would you support MTS ballot measures that include funding for bicycle infrastructure?

I would absolutely support a ballot measure that would include funding for bicycle infrastructure. After AB805 the county will play a bigger role allowing me to fight harder for and support pro-bike programs and infrastructure.

Unfortunately, improved safety conditions for bicyclists have been opposed by segments of the community. Politicians often seek a “consensus” solution, but these are not always possible. How would you work with all sides to ensure safety improvements occur?

We are far past seeking consensus solutions. For generations the focus on transportation has been automobiles. It is time we focused on creating true equity in transportation by spending more of our regions transportation resources to support cycling and active transportation. If implemented correctly, we can reduce Greenhouse Gas emissions, create safe biking conditions, and help create bike conditions that make San Diego a national leader for cycling. Safety for all San Diegans needs to be the priority, not politics.